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Celebrity Face Morphs

Pedro Berg Johnsen of Norway has an unusual hobby: in his spare time, he combines portraits of celebrities to create real-looking photos of people that don’t actually exist. For example, the portrait above was created by blending the heads and faces of actress Angelina Jolie and actress Megan Fox.

Chris Pratt + Harrison Ford

Heath Ledger + Tom Hardy

Morphing is a special effect in motion pictures and animations that changes (or morphs) one image or shape into another through a seamless transition. Most often it is used to depict one person turning into another through technological means or as part of a fantasy or surreal sequence. Traditionally such a depiction would be achieved through cross-fading techniques on film. Since the early 1990s, this has been replaced by computer software to create more realistic transitions.

Natalie Dormer + Emma Watson

Chris Pratt + Patrick Wilson

Chris Pratt / Chris Evans / Chris Hemsworth

In the early 1990s computer techniques that often produced more convincing results began to be widely used. These involved distorting one image at the same time that it faded into another through marking corresponding points and vectors on the “before” and “after” images used in the morph. For example, one would morph one face into another by marking key points on the first face, such as the contour of the nose or location of an eye, and mark where these same points existed on the second face. The computer would then distort the first face to have the shape of the second face at the same time that it faded the two faces. To compute the transformation of image coordinates required for the distortion, the algorithm of Beier and Neely can be used.

Later, more sophisticated cross-fading techniques were employed that vignetted different parts of one image to the other gradually instead of transitioning the entire image at once. This style of morphing was perhaps most famously employed in the video that former 10cc members Kevin Godley and Lol Creme (performing as Godley & Creme) produced in 1985 for their song Cry. It comprised a series of black and white close-up shots of faces of many different people that gradually faded from one to the next. In a strict sense, this had little to do with modern-day computer generated morphing effects, since it was merely a dissolve using fully analog equipment.

Taylor Swift + Emma Watson

Matt Bomer + Jake Gyllenhaal

Emma Watson + Kristen Stewart

Jeremy Renner + Chris Evans

Michael Shannon + Jake Gyllenhaal

Arnold Schwarzenegger + Colin Farrell

Morphing algorithms continue to advance and programs can automatically morph images that correspond closely enough with relatively little instruction from the user. This has led to the use of morphing techniques to create convincing slow-motion effects where none existed in the original film or video footage by morphing between each individual frame using optical flow technology. Morphing has also appeared as a transition technique between one scene and another in television shows, even if the contents of the two images are entirely unrelated. The algorithm in this case attempts to find corresponding points between the images and distort one into the other as they crossfade.

While perhaps less obvious than in the past, morphing is used heavily today. Whereas the effect was initially a novelty, today, morphing effects are most often designed to be seamless and invisible to the eye.

 

Natalie Dormer + Elsa Hosk

Mads Mikkelsen + Hugh Dancy

Ethan Hawke + Brad Pitt

Elizabeth Olsen + Scarlett Johansson

 

source: petapixel.com

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